Mountain Goat Hunting Gear List

Mountain Goat Hunting Gear List

Remember, on most mountain hunts you’ll be on the move, might even be spiking out, and you’ll want to go light.

If you stick to this gear list, you’ll have everything you need on your hunt. If you’re on a guided hunt, your outfitter will provide a Satellite phone, or an Inreach for emergencies, and a first aid kit. Also, food, stove, fuel, water filters and tents will be provided on a guided hunt.

You may have other items on this list that you want to bring. Please bring anything you think you may need but remember the highest luxury on a mountain hunt is lightweight. Keeping your pack light for day trips or hikes to spike camps will make your hunt much easier and more enjoyable than any heavy luxury item you may desire. If you show up with a very heavy load, your guide will likely have a culling session with you and your gear. Any items that are not needed in spike camps may be left at a base camp.

Clothing

Do not take cotton! Use synthetic or wool clothing ONLY.

  • Good, sturdy mountain boots: We recommend Lowa Hunter EVO, Scarpa Wrangell, LaSportiva Glacier, Kennetrek, Hoffman, Zamberlain, Lathrop and Sons. Please DO NOT show up with brand new boots, break them in. Even if it is just wearing them for a few weeks in your daily routine.
  • Socks: 3 pairs high quality wool socks.
  • Sock Liners: 3 pair Wigwam Gobis®™
  • Duct Tape: 1 – 10 feet of Duct tape VERY IMPORTANT!! Apply Duct tape (regular duct tape, not gorilla tape or other thicker brands) to any “hot spot” or sore area; directly to your skin, BEFORE you get blisters. This is a proven method, far superior to moleskin or other blister remedies. Blisters can ruin your hunt, DO NOT wait for a convenient location to stop, do it as soon as you feel anything uncomfortable.
  • Long Underwear: (light weight) 1 top, 1 bottom; wool or synthetic
  • Long Underwear: (mid-weight) 1 top, 1 bottom; wool or synthetic
  • Pants: 1 pair durable synthetic or Schoeller fabric equivalent.
  • Shirt: (midweight) 1 Long sleeve, wool or synthetic
  • Jacket: Fleece
  • Raingear: Lightweight jacket and pants or bibs.
  • Overcoat: Synthetic parka with hood.
  • Gloves: 1 pair wool or fleece
  • Hat: wool or fleece

Hunting Gear

  • Headlamp
  • Gaiters: 1 pair of Outdoor Research gaiters or equivalent.
  • Gore Tex fly fishing waders with high quality wading boots (important for crossing shallow streams on hunts in Alaska).
  • Water Bottles: 2 32 oz. H2O Bottles
  • Sleeping pad: 1 Thermarest Ridgerest or Neo Air.
  • Sleeping Bag:  0°ƒ Synthetic filled mummy bag.
  • Binoculars: 10×42
  • UV Sunglasses
  • Cap
  • Trekking poles
  • Backpack: frame or internal frame pack 5,500 cubic inches.
  • Lightweight Dry Bags for gear.
  • Kahtoola Microspikes
  • Game bags
  • Handheld GPS unit
  • Camera
  • Rangefinder
  • Lens cleaner
  • 1 Liter water bottle
  • Bic lighter
  • Knife
  • Multi-tool
  • Spotting Scope with Tripod
  • Rubber gloves

Misc. Equipment

  • Hunting License, Permit Paperwork, and Locking Tag (if needed)
  • Travel clothes
  • Taxidermist shipping tags
  • Camp shoes
  • Toiletries: medication, toothbrush, small toothpaste, sunscreen, sunglasses etc.

Cash for Tips

A tip is a reward for a job well done. It is considered customary in the guiding industry as it is in the restaurant industry.

Please tip on the effort of your guide, not necessarily the quality of your trophy. A tip of 10% is standard for a good job, slightly less for a satisfactory job. If you feel your guide has done a very poor job, do not tip them, and discuss it with your outfitter. Please feel free to openly discuss tipping with your guide. Most guides use the best equipment they can afford at their income level. Cash is generally preferred but if you want to use an item (rifle, binoculars, clothing etc) as a tip or portion of a tip please discuss it with your guide first.

Shooting Practice

Set a self imposed yardage limit based upon your shooting ability that you are confident you can hit an 8” circle 99% of the time in hunting conditions.

Share this limit with your guide, stick to that limit. You can almost always get closer with some effort. There are many variables in mountain hunting; wind, shot angle, and animal movements make long range shooting extremely unpredictable. If you arrive with a limit of 800 yards and have less than 5 years of service with Spec Ops or a sniper team, your guide will impose a realistic limit for you (likely around 400 yards) Make every possible effort for clean, first shot kill. Long range shooting classes are highly recommended but do not make up for thousands of rounds of real world practice required to shoot extreme distances.)

What about hiring an outfitter for your mountain goat hunt?

With a wide range of mountain goat hunts available ranging from over-the-counter and conservation tags to controlled hunt permits that you must draw, we can help you through the entire process. If you have questions or would like to go on a mountain goat hunt, just contact us. Give us a detailed description of what you are looking for, so our hunting consultants can match you with the right hunt. Whatever suits you, we can help you find it.