Outdoor Gear Reviews

GEAR REVIEW: Kryptek Dalibor Soft Shell System

kryptek-dalibor

The Kryptek Dalibor Lightweight Softshell provides exceptional protection from the elements for the active user. The Dalibor is the go-to layering option when it is necessary to balance temperature fluctuation with levels of exertion. Water resistant, exceptionally durable, and field tested for over two years in the Alaska wilderness; the Dalibor is destined to quickly become one of your favorite Backcountry pieces. Intended for later season & cooler temperatures while being active, this pant and jacket system will extend into the late season months with a proper Kryptek layering system.

 

Kryptek Dalibor Pants

Buy it here »

 

 Dalibor Pant
- water resistant
- stretch fabric
- low profile waist adjustment system
- suspender compatible
- knee pad pockets
- articulated knees
- weight 23.4oz

(Mechanical Stretch Woven Soft shell bonded)100% Polyester
Face: Paper Print + DWR (80/20) + Cire X 2 + Bonded
Back: P/D
imported

Kryptek Dalibor Jacket

Buy it here »

 

Dalibor Jacket
- water resistant
- stretch fabric
- low profile waist adjustment system
- suspender compatible
- knee pad pockets
- articulated knees
- weight 23.4oz

(Mechanical Stretch Woven Soft shell bonded)100% Polyester
Face: Paper Print + DWR (80/20) + Cire X 2 + Bonded
Back: P/D
imported

March 05, 2014
Read More

Which Kryptek Pants Should I Buy?

glassing in Kryptek

Question: How do the Cadog and Valhalla pants by Kryptek compare?

Justin-iconAnswer: These pants are quite different, they are on opposite ends of the scale as far as type of use. I will give you a quick simple answer and if you want more detail you can let me know If I need to go into technical side of the specifications.

Kryptek Valhalla Pants

Kryptek Valhalla pants in Highlander

Kryptek Valhalla pants in Highlander

The Valhalla is designed as an early season lightweight pant. It has the same athletic cut as the full line of Kryptek pant. It is a built as a minimalist pant meant for high physical activity. It is made with a thin 4 way stretch material (polyester / spanex: 88/12% blend). This makes it a quick drying performance pant. It is not intended to beat the brush. It is simple and functional & does not have the tactical featured system as it’s bigger bothers that come with 10 pockets, knee pad pocket, waterproof 3m knees, reinforced knees & adjustable waist system for layering. These pants are great for early season deer, elk antelope…

Buy Now »

Kryptek Cadog Pants

Kryptek Cadog pants in Highlander

Kryptek Cadog pants in Highlander

The Cadog is a soft shell bonded fleece lined cold weather pant designed for cooler temperatures & less activity. (100% polyester) The Cadog has the tactical featured pockets (10 including one on the calf), external access knee pads pocket, waterproof 3m knees, reinforced knees, suspender compatible & adjustable waste system. It also has been sprayed with a DWR coating (80/20) which makes it water resistant for a short time. It also comes in a jacket making it a complete Cadog system. Great for tree stand hunting whitetail or bear, late season hunting, & glassing in cooler temperatures.

Buy Now »

Feel free to call or email me with any additional questions you may have. I want to make sure you chose the right system for the right hunt. You can buy all the right gear but if it isn’t used correctly you won’t get the biggest benefit of having a high end technical hunting clothes. ~ Justin “The Gear Junkie” Sparks

February 28, 2014
Read More

TAG Bags Game Bag Testing and Development

-Larry Bartlett
Author / Wilderness Guide

I’m constantly thinking of new ways to further my career in the Alaska out of doors. In doing so I find myself trying the strangest things to occupy my time when not hunting or guiding river goers into the wilderness. Anyway, my latest thoughts led me to ponder the use of conventional game bags, which are used to cover and house big game meat after hunters harvest animals in the field.

These game bags serve to protect game meat from contaminants like dirt, sand, bacteria, and flies, to name a few. Now, game bag manufacturers produce thousands of bags each season to sell to diligent hunters who buy into the “protection” theory. However, likely to lower production costs for higher profit margins these manufacturers continue to make bags out of cotton fabric. Why? Because cotton is widely available, cheap to manufacture, and versatile. Unfortunately though, cotton is slowly becoming an ancient fabric for superior protection, because outdoors people have become well educated on the ill results of using cotton for personal protection from inclement climates. The fact is cotton is overly absorbent, non-wicking, unnecessarily heavy, and is useless when wet.

Putting some thought into the cotton “issue” forced me to question, as always, the way we hunters do business. By that I mean how we hunters rely on what products are available because we put faith into product manufacturers. Unfortunately for us, these manufacturers sometimes develop products that are only best for profit margins and not so great for the consumer. Game bags made of cotton are a prime example. So I question the fact that if cotton is ill-suited for human clothing in the out of doors, is it also ill-suited for game meat “clothing” in the out of doors? If so, then why? And what can we do to prove it, but also to resolve the problem? These are the questions I’ll attempt to answer in this study.

Well, the answers came with surprising clarity, but I had to come up with a theory and then develop a plan to test that theory under believable conditions to produce anything close to scientific results. Given my very limited background in scientific testing and the fact that I had virtually no funding for such a project, I’d have to make do with my limitations.

Here’s what I came up with:

THEORY: Since common game bag material is constructed “mostly” of cotton, microscopic molds, mildew, and other bacteria are allowed to freely develop and actually saturate and then impregnate game bag material fiber due largely to its moisture retaining attributes. If this is true, common game bags contribute to, even if to the slightest degree, surface spoilage of game meat that has remained wrapped in contaminated fabrics. This bacteria then multiples at undetermined rates until game meat becomes consumed in bacteria and is rendered unfit to consume. This obviously doesn’t happen overnight, and I’m assuming the worse possible scenarios with field handling techniques, warm and wet climate, poor stowage conditions, and improper techniques. That is, less diligent hunters will have greater degrees of meat spoilage than will highly diligent hunters; however, my theory suggests that cotton naturally opposes hunter efforts due to the fabric’s inability to wick moisture, providing a perfect medium for bacterial growth.

TEST: I felt it was important to see how quickly mold and mildew, which are the most common bacteria in the early stages of meat spoilage, began to cultivate on cotton fabrics. I then needed to study direct comparisons of alternative materials under the same conditions applied to cotton. Therefore, I conducted mold studies of three types of fabrics: 1) A 100% cotton game bag material, 2) a blended material (heavy-duty game bag), and 3) a 100% synthetic fabric (200 denier non-coated nylon).

LIMITATIONS:

 

  1. I had no access to technical laboratory machines or other technology due to budget constraints, but I felt that I could gain the necessary results using some intuitive thinking.
  2. I had to perform these studies indoors due to outside climate conditions here in Alaska. I used a dark boiler room with ambient temps in the 70-79 degree F range, so the conditions weren’t exactly like those found in actual hunting environments.
  3. I planned to use sight and smell as the initial “testers” (24-48 hours) and a laboratory microscope at 48 hours, 4 days, 7 days, and 10 days.
  4. I placed the fabric samples into separate plastic Zip-locä airtight containers to prevent airflow, which helped expedite the negative results (desired effect).
  5. I’m not formally trained in the field of microscopic science, so my results could be severely inaccurate unless grossly obvious to the laymen, which I’m hoping for.
  6. This will not be a solid scientific study because I won’t be working will unbiased parties, will not pursue double-blind protocol, and will not be working in a controlled environment.

QUALIFYING FACTORS: I felt that this semi-controlled and warmer environment would allow me to expedite mold and mildew development, which would serve to produce adequate results for the purpose of personal education. After all, I was ultimately trying to determine whether cotton fabric contributes to game meat spoilage by fostering bacterial growth within the fabric itself. I am merely interested, at this point, in obtaining preliminary findings that will aid in my research and development stage of product discovery. This test, though grossly laymen, will serve the purposes of my study and will likely result in the development of new Game Bag Technology, which will help improve hunter performance with field care concerns.

RESULTS: Once the mold studies were initiated I had to estimate how quickly and at what rate mold began to develop at certain stages (in hours and days), just like a field environment.

24 Hours:

  1. 100% Cotton fabric: No visible discoloration noted, but a faint “smell” of mildew was present. Fabric completely saturated with moisture.
  2. Blended fabric (unstated ratio of cotton:synthetic): No change in color or smell. Fabric completely saturated with moisture.
  3. 100% Synthetic fabric: No change in color or smell. Fabric nearly dry, moisture collected at the bottom of the test container. This leads me to believe in the wicking traits of synthetics.

48 Hours:

  1. 100% Cotton fabric: Slight discoloration. Stronger “smell” of mildew was present. Fabric still completely saturated with moisture.
  2. Blended fabric (unstated ratio of cotton:synthetic): No change in color with only a slight odor of mildew. Fabric still completely saturated with moisture
  3. 100% Synthetic fabric: No change in color or smell. Fabric completely dry and all moisture still in the bottom of the test container. Material forced to set in moisture by setting weighted steel ball on top of fabric sample.

4 days:

  1. 100% Cotton fabric: Yellow discoloration was evident and strong ammonia-like odor present. Microscopic bacterial develop was approximately four times more abundant (wide spread and layered) than found on the blended fabric and “much greater” growth than the synthetic fabric. Juices in test container are yellow-brown and very odoriferous.
  2. Blended fabric (unstated ratio of cotton:synthetic): Yellow discoloration was slight and ammonia-like odor present but not overwhelming. Microscopic bacterial develop was evenly distributed but not layered. Juices in container are turning yellow and have developed an odor.
  3. 100% Synthetic fabric: No odor changes and no discoloration visible. Only minute trace bacterial growth found under microscope. However, areas where test fabric was unsaturated by juices had no growth or discoloration.

7 days:

  1. 100% Cotton fabric: Yellow discoloration was immense and overwhelming ammonia-like odor present. Bacterial develop consumed the fabric. No microscope needed.
  2. Blended fabric (unstated ratio of cotton:synthetic): Yellow discoloration was evident and strong ammonia-like odor present. Microscopic bacterial develop was beginning to become wide spread and layered like the 4-day sample of the 100% cotton fabric. Juices in test container are yellow-brown and very odoriferous.
  3. 100% Synthetic fabric: No odor changes and no discoloration visible. Microscopic bacteria only present where moisture collected near the corner of the fabric. Juices in container had no smell or discoloration.

10 days: No additional tests performed due to indisputable 7-day results. Test was cancelled after the 7-day results were concluded.

CONCLUSION: A cross-section analysis (microscope) of individual cotton fibers suggested that the cultivated growth appeared to be part of the original composition of that fiber. The same analysis performed on a fragment of nylon indicated that the minute growth was attached to what appeared to be the outer wall of the plastic fiber. My evidence of this was limited by my lack of knowledge in this area of scientific research. However, it was enough to convince me that my initial beliefs were accurate.

Common game bag materials made of cotton do actually foster mold and mildew growth within the fabric itself and do not provide adequate moisture wicking attributes, which likely contribute to surface bacterial development and meat spoilage to some degree. I believe this condition to be very similar to a mildew marinade, which impregnates cotton fibers and releases bacteria on a constant interval, especially when the cotton fabric is not kept dry. Once surface areas of game meat begin to grow bacteria, such as mold and mildew, cotton fabric provides no wicking protection or resistance to this process.

The simple fact that cotton “fosters” negative results proves my theory and is thereby inadequate for “preventing” spoilage, and even if to the slightest degree it should be considered unfavorable material for game meat protection.

It is the hunter’s responsibility to provide the best care of the animals he or she harvests. That includes taking every measure to prevent or reduce the slightest chance of losing edible meat resulting from preventable forces.

Even if the most diligent hunter provides top-quality care of their game meat kept inside common cotton game bags, there is a good chance that surface areas of game meat will become “spoiled” by mold and mildew within 48 hours. There is also a great likelihood of substantial bacterial growth compounding severely after undetermined periods, depending on the climate, when proper measures are not taken to prevent contributing factors (i.e., poor ventilation and moist game bags coupled with warm temperatures). I am not suggesting that hunters are doomed for failure by using common game bags, but that the attributes of cotton are not worth the risks now that a more advanced and proven alternative is available. Furthermore, toss in “natural” conditions like warm weather, wet conditions, and decreased air circulation and game care results rapidly degrade and the prognosis for the game meat becomes grim.

Common Question: If this is such a big deal, why hasn’t anyone (namely hunters) learned of these concerns on their own?

Best Answer: I believe the reason why hunters don’t know much about meat spoilage is two fold: 1) we have found comfort in the fact that there is an “acceptable” level, or at least a small degree, of meat spoilage resulting from remote hunting scenarios in inclement climates, and 2) most hunters aren’t aware that surface molds and mildew are one of the greatest contributors to meat spoilage besides the natural process of post mortem decomposition. However, the molds that were produced in this study do not have the same characteristics (odor and composition) as what hunters see on their game meat, simply because the natural odors of game meat conceal those of “common” molds and mildew, and the process of decomposing flesh coupled with surface bacteria create an entirely different bacterial process. Therefore, I’m suggesting that we hunters do recognize (by smell) the different degrees or intensities of game meat spoilage each day it remains afield, but that we are largely unaware of the levels of decomposition. Furthermore, the type of bag we choose to protect our game meat impacts its edible quality and will also influence the overall amount of spoilage to be trimmed and discarded when processing it for the freezer. In laymen terms, superior bag technology provides better results for less diligent hunters and superior results for more diligent hunters.

The truth is, many hunters will continue to effectively use common game bags without much game meat spoilage. This is due to their personal knowledge of game care issues and their willingness to go the extra mile with meat care concerns. For these folks, synthetic bags will only sharpen their results. Still, these hunters benefit by using synthetic game bags because of the many tangible attributes of this fabric (see below).

This was truly a fascinating study, albeit a non-specific and highly subjective (non-technical) method. It allowed me to better understand the “unseen” but often smelled degrees of meat spoilage and I proved to myself that cotton fabrics truly have no right to be used in the field environment, especially for the care of game meat. Hindsight is perfect vision, and I now clearly see that if cotton fabrics are not suitable as human clothing in inclement conditions, it stands to reason that cotton is unsuitable for game meat clothing as well.

Benefits of using cotton game bags:

  1. Highly permeable material which allows superior ventilation (very important)
  2. Cheap to manufacturer
  3. Widely available
  4. Re-usable

Negative attributes of cotton game bags:

  1. Highly absorbent
  2. No moisture wicking protection
  3. Fosters bacterial growth by absorbing it into the fibers
  4. Material is unnecessarily heavy
  5. No mildew or mold resistance
  6. Trace residue of bacteria (blood and molds) remains impregnated in fabric, even after repeated washes with bleach.

Benefits of synthetic game bags:

  1. Superior moisture wicking protection
  2. Superior resistance to mold and mildew
  3. Provides adequate ventilation
  4. Extremely lightweight material
  5. More durable than cotton
  6. Longer lasting material strength
  7. Virtually no shrinkage compared to cotton

Negative attributes of nylon game bags:

  1. Extremely heat sensitive (open flames)
  2. Slightly more expensive than cotton
  3. Less permeable than cotton

I learned that synthetic fabrics allow superior ventilation, greater bacterial resistance, are roughly 5X lighter in weight than comparable cotton strengths, and still very much affordable. I believe that synthetic game bags are now the new standard issue for big game hunters who demand high-level protection from spoilage! By the way, 6 standard canvas-type game bags weigh over 10 lbs., while 6 synthetic bags weigh less than 2 lbs. If two hunters go afield with 12 quality cotton game bags, the total weight exceeds 20 lbs. With 12 synthetic game bags they’d save themselves over 15 lbs. of gear weight, which is a huge benefit when weight limits are concerning (i.e., fly-in hunts).

Buy Now

November 27, 2013
Read More

Kryptek Aegis System Review

222437_4762056971402_2066924707_nI got an opportunity to put the Kryptek Aegis extreme weather bibs and coat to the test this last year on a November whitetail hunt in Illinois.  It was in the 20′s every morning and got to about 40 max with wind, during the day, almost all 6 days of the hunt.  I sat the stand all day long all 6 days.  Day one, I went without either the top or bottom thinking I could “get by.”  After a full day of shivering my butt off, I went full tilt the following day.  I packed my Aegis into the stand (you can’t hike in them, they are just too hot) and one thing I loved about them was how easy the bibs were to get on over my boots with the full leg zips.  They are like climbing into a sleeping bag…simply awesome.

I like to be as free as possible so when I could get away with it I didn’t wear my coat and the bibs alone made a HUGE difference.  With how warm they kept my core they are what I used the most.   If I could only afford one part of that system I would buy the bibs first.  We did get one day of heavy all day rain as well and they performed awesome as a rainproof layer.  I didn’t get a bit wet and again it rained all day.

The only other opportunity I have had to use them was on a N. Texas January hunt.  We had to ride a long ways in to the hunting every morning and evening and the coldest it got when I was hunting there was 17 degrees.  It made for some COLD rides.  Again, day one, I thought I could get away without using the Aegis but after learning my lesson I was in Aegis head to toe all the rest of the days. As a side note the Kryptek Wyot Balaclava was a rock star as well at keeping me warm.  I was blown away how that little thin deal could make such a difference.   Overall the Aegis gets my thumbs up!!

by Marc Warnke

October 23, 2013
Read More

Tag Bags… They Don’t Stink

Marc Warnke and his 2013 elk

I had multiple opportunities to use Tag Bags this season. What an outstanding product!

I carry a smaller Tenzing TZ 1250 pack (most of the time) in the elk woods and I needed a light compact game bag system and Tag Bag filled the bill. I used the Propack Small. It weighed in at only 18 ounces and was contained in a very small book sized package. The bags themselves once folded out were surprisingly huge (24″ x 44″).

Marc getting out his TAG Bags game bags
I butchered two different elk so far this season and was able to fit both bone in quarters, and for boned out, it was more than large enough. There were several things that really stood out about these bags beyond their lightness and compact size.

  • I love how large they are. When I was doing the quartering and butchering, I was able to use them as a clean surface to lay the meat on while I processed and wrestled with the boning procedure.
  • They stay clean. Most bags I’ve used in the past collect every single piece of dirt and pine needle and are rendered useless as a clean surface in no time.
  • They are amazingly strong and the clean up on them was stupid simple. I didn’t even need to wash them in the washing machine (which pisses mama off). I just hosed them out and they looked like brand new (although I got mine back to civilization pretty quickly which meant I didn’t have to clean off dried in blood and goo). As far as the whole bacteria competent, I’m no scientist but my meat came back smelling good and the bag did not retain a “stink.” I’m assuming that is a good sign.

TAG Bags with an elk quarter
*One more thing you should know. Getting the bags back into the mesh container after use was a challenge at first, till I figured out how to do it. The factory fold before rolling them up is 4 folds. I’m not a machine, so, when I folded it four times, it wasn’t enough to get them not to fit like a banana. The trick is to fold them 6 times and then they slide right in and all fit well.

TAG Bags cleaning an elk
I’ve boned and butchered almost all of my 23 elk I’ve killed with a bow and for years I have bitched about the bags on the market. Cheers to Tag Bags for coming up with such a well thought out design.

by Marc Warnke

October 18, 2013
Read More

Hardcore Bird Bags by Outdoor Life

A torture test of two technical upland packs By Brian Lynn of Outdoor Life

tenzing-upland-bird-vest-reviewIn recent years, the traditional upland vest has evolved into a lightweight, technical pack designed for the all-day back-country bird hunter.

We pitted the Tenzing TZ BV13 against the Badlands Birdvest to determine which would be best for bird hunts in the back of beyond. We left them out for the dogs to play with, wore them through a 35-mile-long muddy obstacle course, and even dragged them down gravel roads.

Design/Construction

The Tenzing has a backpack feel in both anatomy and material, while the Badlands is more a vest-pack hybrid. Considerable thought has gone into the design of both, but the deciding factor here is perhaps the most important feature for upland hunters: the entire 2,000-cubic-inch interior of the Tenzing comprises the game bag, and plenty of mesh ensures airflow over freshly killed birds.

EDGE : Tenzing

Durability

The Heavy-duty material of the Tenzing will hold up to years of abuse; the plasticky clip-on blaze-orange shell (inset) will not. If 400 square inches of blaze orange is required in your state, the TV BV13 is only as good as long as that shell lasts. The Badlands will serve you far longer.

EDGE : Badlands

Comfort

Compared to the 2-pound 5 ounce Badlands, the Tenzing (3 pounds 2 ounces) isn’t that much heavier – plus it has an adjustable suspension and waist belt to ease load bearing. But when the TZ BV13 was soaked with mud and water, it became considerably heavier. The Badlands’ exterior is made of water-shedding nylon.

EDGE : Badlands

Utility

The Tenzing has more and larger pockets. The badlands’ outer mechpockets are essentially useless, with no way to secure cargo in them. Whilte the badlands’ removable game bag is clever, it would be difficult to fit a limit of roosters inside.

EDGE : Tenzing

Amenities/ Accessories

Both packs accept hydration bladder (sold separately). That Badlands’ removable game bag makes clean-up easy, while the Tenzing can be fully unzipped and turned inside out for cleaning. The Badlands’ shell pockets feature an impressive magnetic locking system that will hold more than half a box of shell securely – even when turned upside down, The Tenzing has larger, dual-compartment pockets that will hold more than a box of loose shells, plus it has shell loops.

EDGE : Tenzing

Price / Value

The ease of use and additional cargo space you get with the Tenzing are well worth the extra $20.

EDGE : Tenzing

Shop Now for the Tenzing BV13

October 11, 2013
Read More

TAG Bags Synthetic Game Bags Review

T.A.G. Bags

TAG Bags
Even though the quality of your game bags are of the utmost importance, there hasn’t been an advance in game bag technology for a long time. Hunters are willing to spend hundreds, even thousands of dollars to shave a few ounces off of their hunting gear, but think nothing of packing around heavy cotton game bags. Then along came TAG Bags. If you are still using the cheap cotton or heavy canvas game bags, read on and I’m sure that I’ll change your mind.

TAG BAGS Game BagsT.A.G. BAGS were designed by Larry Bartlett, a wilderness guide in Alaska to help “prevent meat spoilage” while in the backcountry. The folks at Pristine Ventures have even conducted an in-house study on the differences between cotton and synthetic game bags. The results were overwhelmingly favorable for a synthetic game bag material.

Purchase TAG Bags here.

See the results of the TAG Bag study here:

The truth is, many hunters will continue to effectively use common game bags without much game meat spoilage. This is due to their personal knowledge of game care issues and their willingness to go the extra mile with meat care concerns. For these folks, synthetic bags will only sharpen their results. Still, these hunters benefit by using synthetic game bags because of the many tangible attributes of this fabric (see below).

This was truly a fascinating study, albeit a non-specific and highly subjective (non-technical) method. It allowed me to better understand the “unseen” but often smelled degrees of meat spoilage and I proved to myself that cotton fabrics truly have no right to be used in the field environment, especially for the care of game meat. Hindsight is perfect vision, and I now clearly see that if cotton fabrics are not suitable as human clothing in inclement conditions, it stands to reason that cotton is unsuitable for game meat clothing as well.

Benefits of using cotton game bags:

  1. Highly permeable material which allows superior ventilation (very important)
  2. Cheap to manufacturer
  3. Widely available
  4. Re-usable

Negative attributes of cotton game bags:

  1. Highly absorbent
  2. No moisture wicking protection
  3. Fosters bacterial growth by absorbing it into the fibers
  4. Material is unnecessarily heavy
  5. No mildew or mold resistance
  6. Trace residue of bacteria (blood and molds) remains impregnated in fabric, even after repeated washes with bleach.

Benefits of synthetic game bags:

  1. Superior moisture wicking protection
  2. Superior resistance to mold and mildew
  3. Provides adequate ventilation
  4. Extremely lightweight material
  5. More durable than cotton
  6. Longer lasting material strength
  7. Virtually no shrinkage compared to cotton

Negative attributes of nylon game bags:

  1. Extremely heat sensitive (open flames)
  2. Slightly more expensive than cotton
  3. Less permeable than cotton

I learned that synthetic fabrics allow superior ventilation, greater bacterial resistance, are roughly 5X lighter in weight than comparable cotton strengths, and still very much affordable. I believe that synthetic game bags are now the new standard issue for big game hunters who demand high-level protection from spoilage! By the way, 6 standard canvas-type game bags weigh over 10 lbs., while 6 synthetic bags weigh less than 2 lbs. If two hunters go afield with 12 quality cotton game bags, the total weight exceeds 20 lbs. With 12 synthetic game bags they’d save themselves over 15 lbs. of gear weight, which is a huge benefit when weight limits are concerning (i.e., fly-in hunts). ~Larry Bartlett

TAG Bags are much lighter than canvas game bags and more efficiently protect your game meat than cotton game bags. They are fast drying, lightweight, shrink resistant and durable.

TAG Bags are also reusable and very easy to clean after use. A quick rinse with water to get the bulk of the blood out, followed up with washing them with a mild detergent and water.

I can’t wait to put my new game bags to use this season! Get your TAG Bags here.
Cory Glauner

August 29, 2013
Read More

Kenetrek Insoles for Boots | Review

Foot DiagramFeet that hurt when your hunting and hiking can plain ruin your hunting experience. This is where having insoles for boots can really make a difference.

Over the last 20 years of hunting I have used a lot of different systems to  hike in and one thing that is consistent is if I don’t have the right arch support my feet will ache the whole time. My issue is I have a real high arch. Everybody has a different arch type. Lucky, this is something that can be corrected pretty easily. Knowing what your arch is can make all the difference in how your boots fit no matter how good of boots they are. You first need to know what type of foot you have. There are 3 types of arch. High arch, Normal arch, & Flatfoot.

*See the pictures to the right to see which foot category you fit into.

High Arch Insoles for Boots
The most extreme type that can cause the most problems that needs to be corrected is the High Arch Type. This is what I have.  There are a whole bunch of different types of arch supports out there that range in price so I suggest trying a couple different types as each one fits a little bit different. I have used super feet (http://www.superfeet.com/) in the past and they put out a great system.  I’m pretty picky when it comes to insoles in boots and  my hunting boots, I have tried a lot of different brands and my go to pair of boots is made by Kenetrek Boots. They  just started offering there own arch support system that goes hand and hand with there awesome boots.

These four piece, three layer insoles begin with a durable, anti-microbial pad that wicks away moisture and refuses to let odor escape. It sits atop a 4mm high density moldable foam, that quickly takes on your foot shape. Below that we’ve combined a silicone gel insert to cushion the ball of your foot with a firm, supportive base layer to keep your arch and heel stable and you on your feet all day long!

Insoles for Boots with a Less Extreme Arch
If you have a less extreme arch, Kenetrek Boots also offers a cushion insoles that will help give you just a little more cushion in your boots. This will really make a difference after pounding out those last couple of miles back to camp!

With extra high impact zone padding to our wicking, anti-microbial pad. And to guarantee your boots to stay scent free, utilizing state of the art activated carbon technology. By setting the top high impact zone layer over the 4mm high density moldable foam, you’ll have a soft ride in your boot.

To see our full line up of Kenetrek Products Click Here.

July 02, 2013
Read More

Kryptek Highlander Pattern Review

Kryptek Highlander Pattern

Kryptek Highlander Pattern

The Kryptek Highlander pattern is designed to improve stealth, ultimately increasing the lethality of the hunter.

The Kryptek highlander pattern provide an advantage by reducing visual acquisition through the combination of proven camouflage concepts, scientific principles and field testing. The Kryptek™ designs incorporate proven principles of visual deception based on mimicry of foliage, animal, marine and geographic visual qualities. These principles have been combined with evolutionary concepts and fused with state of the art technology to offer the utmost in effective concealment in differing environments.

Kryptek™ utilizes a multi-directional design to effectively conceal in a multitude of terrains that have either a lateral or vertical flow. The bi-level layering of the patterns incorporate background transitional shading and sharp random geometrical foregrounds to create a three dimensional effect that ensures the utmost in concealment at both close and long ranges. These components combined with colorations selected and matched based on input from testing and observations from Operators in the field make Kryptek™ Camo the ultimate in passive battlefield deception.

Shop for Kryptek here.

July 02, 2013
Read More

Kryptek Koldo Blockade Rain Jacket

Kryptek-Koldo-Rain-Jacket

Kryptek Koldo Rain JacketWhat Our Pro Staff on this Kryptek Koldo Blockade Rain Jacket Review Marc Warnke and Justin Sparks recently tested the new Kryptek Gear on a late season archery mule deer hunt. It was typical Idaho weather…. rain, sleet and snow. All they wore was the Kryptek merino base layer and the Koldo Blockade rain jacket, and it was the perfect match. As you’ll see in the video they did alot of climbing. They stayed warm (not overheated) and dry… tough to do with rain gear on.
Buy Now


Buy Now

Koldo Blockade Rain Jacket Specs
The Koldo Blockade Jacket is part of our 3 ply waterproof rain set that keeps rain and wind out while maintaining core body temperature. The Jacket fits right, wears great and protects like armor. Generous hood design with several adjustable draw straps. Features a rugged exterior fabric with bonded laminate on the elbows which is guaranteed to stop moisture seepage and undue abrasion. This garment offers rugged stitching with heat-welded seam seals. Combine the Jacket with our Koldo Blockade Pant and comfort and efficiency is guaranteed in any environment.

Buy Now- Pit zips
- Waterproof zippers
- Welded seams
- Chest-high pockets accommodate a pack
- Lined chin guard eliminates zipper chafe
- Inside zip pocket
- Helmet-compatible hood with pull adjustment and extra strong brim
- Draw cords at hem seal in warmth
- Articulated elbows with bonded laminate reinforcement
- Adjustable arm cuffs

Face made with 100% Polyester. Back made with 100% Nylon. Imported.
Polyester Interlock with DWR
Monolithic Dot lamination
Fabric – 185 g/m2 Beemis seem tape Jacket weight – 24.8oz

June 03, 2013
Read More

S4 Gear Lockdown Binocular Harness

S4-Gear-Lockdown-Binocular-Harness

S4-Gear-Lockdown-Binocular-Harness

Keep your binoculars out of the way when you aren’t using them.

Most binocular straps either have no lens protection at all or have a large, unwieldy storage container that offers no attachment or tether while optics are in use.

We have used the S4 Gear Sidewinder Evo as well as the Lockdown binocular harness on all of our hunts. We really like how the S4 Lockdown covers the “top” lenses of your binoculars, holds them close to your chest and out of the way while still keeping your binos very accessible.

What We Thought About S4 Gear Lockdown:

Get your Lockdown Bino Harness here.

June 03, 2013
Read More
  • Field Photos

  • Keep Up-to-date

    Sign up your email or follow our social network for new information updates about products & discounts.
  • Customer Testimonials

    • I can’t tell you how much I enjoy my JP9 Eberlestock Blue Widow backpack. I’m in extremely good shape and my friends tease me that I just try to beat them up, but I couldn't carry the weight with any other pack. Thanks for making me look good.
      Kiviok HightKiviok Hight